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Saving Files

After making adjustments to your pictures it is necessary to save the changes you have made. Until you are sure that you will not want to go back to the original version it is good practise to always use the ‘Save As’ option from the File menu to make a copy.

This will produce another window with various options for saving the file. The folder will default to the one from which you opened the picture but you may change this if you wish by using the drop down arrow:

If you do not select a different folder you must change the file name.

You may also change the file format here by using the drop down arrow.

This will produce another window; JPEG options will allow you to adjust the quality of the picture. The highest quality should be selected for images that are to be printed. Move the slider to the Right (large file). Choose low quality if the image is to be used in email or on the Internet. Move the slider to the Left (small file).

The quality settings in between are used where reasonable quality is to be retained but file size may impact on other applications in which it is to be used. Click OK

File Formats

JPEG
The most commonly used file format is JPEG (Joint Photographic Expert Group), as detailed above. JPEG images may be saved with variable quality ratings (0 – 12), as described above. This allows you to choose a quality that suits a specific requirement, such as large quality for printing, or low quality for internet applications.

The advantage of this format is that images may be viewed by most programs, including playing them on DVD players.

TIFF
Tagged Image File Format. This will produce a large file that maintains image quality to the highest degree as no compression is applied. Mainly used by photographers who are undertaking more advanced manipulation and who will be producing large prints.

You will only be able to view these images when opened with a specialist photo manipulation program such as Photoshop.

RAW
This refers to the ‘raw’ data of the image, to which no compression or manipulation has been applied by the settings of the camera. This format allows the photographer to make adjustments (such as Levels) without loosing any quality. This will produce the best image quality, but also the largest file size so will fill up disc space more quickly.

Mainly used by photographers who are undertaking more advanced manipulation and who will be producing large prints.

You will only be able to view these images when opened with a specialist photo manipulation program such as Photoshop.
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